Designer Maker Blog 2017

Denim Jack cropped

Each month I write a blog linked to my work as a designer maker. This blog is very different to the one I write as a D&T teacher. It focuses only on textiles and is not limited to D&T textiles which is the main focus of my work in D&T. It therefore varies from D&T based textiles themes to craft textiles, art textiles and anything else textiles related that catches my eye. 

Scroll down to see the blogs for this year.

See blogs from previous years 

Mowgs Baskets

It’s been a couple of months since my last blog as life has been so busy. It’s a shame as I see so much inspiration around me that I’d like to showcase on the blog, but with so many other things going on, I often don’t get chance to upload a post. So much of what I see that inspires me is in unusual places and it’s these unexpected surprises that I like the most. Recently on a long road trip we stopped off at Gloucester Services, somewhere we had never stopped before. What an unexpected surprise this was as the services are a fabulous example of eco design along with a big focus on giving the user a great experience. Instead of the traditional fast food restaurants there was a great restaurant with fresh local produce, along with an amazing farm shop. It’s not often you see a fully blown butcher’s department in a service station! 

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In the farm shop I spotted these Mowgs bags made out of repurposed plastic strapping that has been woven. The bags were a riot of colour and immediately caught my eye. On returning home I investigated the weblink on the swing ticket and discovered the bags are all hand made, making each one unique, and that they are made by artisan weavers who use traditional rattan basket weaving techniques. 

Mowgs

Instead of using traditional materials the weavers upcycle the packing tape waste found locally. The bags are distributed by a British company with the aim of supporting the artisan workers and creating items from what would otherwise be waste. 

Mowgs bags
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What a great way of supporting a local community as well as using up common plastic waste. Find out more about Mowgs bags. 


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See blogs from previous years

Look in the side bar to view other blogs I write on textiles, D&T, education & coaching 

Contact:     Tel 01159 607061   Mob 07972 749240  Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk

Proud Teacher Moment!

I have taught many students over the years and one of the ‘perks’ of the job is being able to play a small part in sparking an interest in design in a young person and then seeing that grow. 

I love to hear what my ex students have gone on to do, particularly if it related to design in some way. I was therefore very proud to hear that Nicholas Daley, an ex student in my last school, is one of just fifteen designers recently awarded NEWGEN support by the British Fashion Council. This supports new and emerging talent with the aim of helping them build global, high end fashion brands of the future. Nick has already had some success with his work being stocked in a couple of outlets in London, as well as considerable success in Japan, so hopefully this NEWGEN support will help him develop his business further.

Nick Daley
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Both at GCSE and A level Nick was always an adventurous designer. For his GCSE he designed a giant hamburger bean bag complete with separate layers of bun, burger and salad all of which were over a metre in size! For his AS level he designed a man's jacket with a hood fitted with integrated MP3 player speakers (long before integrated headphones and speakers appeared in the shops), and for his A2 he created a man’s see through PVC coat with a shirt underneath. 

Seeing students go on to exciting futures such as Nick's is very rewarding and it makes all the hard work (and paper work!) as a teacher worthwhile.

Take a look at Nick’s collections as a menswear designer


Return to the main Designer Maker blog page


See blogs from previous years

Look in the side bar to view other blogs I write on textiles, D&T, education & coaching 

Contact:     Tel 01159 607061   Mob 07972 749240  Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk

Creative t.shirts

Who says boys’ clothes have to be boring!

Fish t.shirt

The boys’ clothing buying at Sainsbury’s is obviously a big fan of 3D appliqué and lift up flaps as each season they seem to have at least one t.shirt or jumper featuring some sort of 3D appliqué effect. In fact so much so that I regularly visit that aisle just to have a look at the latest design! 

George the pig t.shirt

I think my favourite is the George Pig that has 4 pockets that unbutton to reveal a story about George’s trip to the woods.

Dinosaur t.shirt

Some designs are quite complex whereas others are effective because of their simplicity. Many use very clever designs that make them extra cute! They are, however, all great fun and much more interesting than the clothes the supermarkets sells for girls!

knitted hoodie with scales
superman t.shirt
Race zone t.shirt
space rocket
Jungle adventure
Tow truck applique t.shirt
Peppa Pig
Dinosaur applique
bus taxi 3D t.shirt
airplane applique t.shirt


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See blogs from previous years

Look in the side bar to view other blogs I write on textiles, D&T, education & coaching 

Contact:     Tel 01159 607061   Mob 07972 749240  Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk

Prize giving presentation to the winner of the 2016 competition for schools

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Eliann Witt: Competition Winner 2016


Eliann was the winner of my 2016 Product in a Tin competition winning a sewing machine for her school as well as lots of textiles related goodies for herself. 

For various reasons the prize giving for the competition was delayed until the beginning of 2017 and it was really exciting to finally meet Eliann and her teacher and to hear more about what inspired the competition entry. 

Eliann's product was a reusable shopping bag that folds up into a pocket created by clever folding of the bag. It is made of a lightweight nylon fabric and uses hand and machine appliqué as well as buttons to create the foxes face. A clever drawstring across the corner of the bag means the bag can fold away into a small pouch. The bag uses French seams on the inside and has shoulder length straps. 

Eliann's product was chosen as the winner because of high level of skill and challenge and quality finish to the product. It was also chosen because it is an unusual design idea that is commercially very marketable. The information on Eliann's application form was also taken into account when choosing a winner. She describes how her product meets user needs that now exist because of the new carrier bag law. She says this has created the need for shoppers to have small, reusable bags that are functional and easy to carry around with you all the time but which are also fun and appealing. 

Eliann won a Husqvarna Viking H Class 100Q sewing machine for her school which normally normally retails for £300. She also won a big bag of prizes for herself. 

Find out more about the machine Eliann won for her school

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Watch the video below to hear Eliann & her teacher, Mrs Lenton, talking about the competition entry.

Eliann is studying textiles at GCSE and aims to go on to study A levels and then a degree in a textiles related area and is particularly interested in a career in costume design for the theatre. 

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See more work from Burford School textiles department here


Find out more about my competitions

Return to the main Designer Maker blog page


See blogs from previous years

Look in the side bar to view other blogs I write on textiles, D&T, education & coaching 

Contact:     Tel 01159 607061   Mob 07972 749240  Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk

A New Kind of Craft

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This blog tends to focus on the craft element of the work I do. This is different from the work I do in education, and which is the focus of much of the rest of the website, which is more focused on Design and Technology (D&T). Whilst there are extremely strong links between D&T and craft (and at times the two are exactly the same thing) there is a significant difference. Whilst both focus on developing skills in designing and making, along with the production of quality products, D&T tends to focus more on the wider world applications of designing and making, including problem solving on a larger scale. There are also often with strong links to industrial practice and mass production, as well strong links to new technologies. 

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What is interesting to me is how the crafts of the future will develop and how high tech many of them will be. Access to IT is relatively easy nowadays making it easier to use CAD software and specialist equipment such as 3D printers. There are also specialist electronic components made specifically for integrating electronics into textiles and the range of high tech materials available even just in a a high street store is quite wide e.g. phosphorescent thread that glows in the dark, photochromic beads and threads that change colour in the sun. 

I recently bought a book called Designing with Smart Textiles by Sarah Kettley and this got me thinking about the crafts of the future. There is no doubt that traditional crafts will always exist but there are a new breed of crafts that are developing that use very different ideas and which open up all sorts of exciting possibilities for the future. Many of the materials and components mentioned in the book are easy to get hold of. This is particularly the case with the easy access the internet gives us to things and it won’t be that long before high street shops like Hobbycraft start to stock some of the more adventurous things such as e-textiles and microcotnrollers. 

The book is divided into 6 sections, some of which focuses on information and points of inspiration, whilst others are packed with project ideas, exercises and activities. 


The book includes instructions for projects and activities and although these are complex for the average crafter they are a great starting point for someone who wants to be a bit more adventurous.

 A particular feature of the book are the case studies of designers and companies who are working in this area. These are great for anyone thinking about careers in more unusual areas of textiles, or as a way of thinking about how traditional careers will change with increased access to this type of technology. 

It would be interesting to step forward in time to see how these exciting developments in textiles filter down to the general craft market. What seems high tech to us now will before long be something that is common practice and before we know it home sewers will be putting e-textiles and micro controllers into garments and textiles items in the same way they use beads and sequins.  


Return to the main Designer Maker blog page

See blogs from previous years

Look in the side bar to view other blogs I write on textiles, D&T, education & coaching 

Contact:     Tel 01159 607061   Mob 07972 749240  Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk

Creativity in the Community

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I love to see creative community projects in my local area and they are a great way to celebrate the arts and raise the profile of the arts in a low key way. I particularly enjoy anything related to getting children involved in creative activities probably because of my background in education. My local shopping centre, the Victoria Centre in Nottingham, often has these types of community events and two recent ones spring to mind. 

For the dress above local children created individual leaves that have been put together to make a skirt and teamed with a corset by a local corsetry designer. The leaves are made of paper painted and decorated by the children.

The dress was coordinated by Susi Henson from Eternal Spirits, a local specialist corsetry and lingerie designer that uses traditional techniques to create steel boned corsets. 

The Centre has a famous clock that was recently renovated and when it was returned to the centre local children were invited to create decorated paper butterflies to reflect the butterflies that are a key feature of the clock design. The butterflies created a lovely display in the centre and the winning design took pride of place on the plaque to commemorate the restoration. 

community victoria centre butterflies

What makes these types of community art activities so successful is the fact people can engage with them, both as a contributor and as an onlooker. They are also relatively simple to organise and cheap to do but their value is important in creating both a community atmosphere as well as an appreciation of creativity. 

Emett clock butterflies


Return to the main Designer Maker blog page

See blogs from previous years

Look in the side bar to view other blogs I write on textiles, D&T, education & coaching 

Contact:     Tel 01159 607061   Mob 07972 749240  Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk

Winners of My 2016 ‘Product in a Tin’ Competition

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Click here to see all previous competitions as well as the current one

2016 Competition Winner: Eliann Witt from Burford School in Oxfordshire

Congratulations to Eliann Witt, a year 10 student from Burford School in Oxfordshire, who is the winner of the ‘Product in a Tin’ competition for schools 2016. Also thanks go to Anne Lenton, Eliann's teacher for her support for Eliann's work. 

Eliann's product is a reusable shopping bag that folds up into a pocket created by clever folding of the bag. It is made of a lightweight nylon fabric and uses hand and machine appliqué as well as buttons to create the foxes face. A clever drawstring across the corner of the bag means the bag can fold away into a small pouch. The bag uses French seams on the inside and has shoulder length straps. 

The product was chosen as the winner because of high level of skill and challenge and quality finish to the product. It was also chosen because it is an unusual design idea that is commercially very marketable. The information on Eliann's application form was also taken into account when choosing a winner. She describes how her product meets user needs that now exist because of the new carrier bag law. She says this has created the need for shoppers to have small, reusable bags that are functional and easy to carry around with you all the time but which are also fun and appealing. 

Eliann won a Husqvarna Viking H Class 100Q sewing machine for her school which normally normally retails for £300. She also won a big bag of prizes for herself. 
Find out more about this machine 

HUGE thank you to Coles Sewing Centre, Nottingham & Husqvarna Viking  who sponsored this fantastic prize. Check out the Coles Sewing Centre website or contact rose@colessewingcentre.co.uk if you are interested in this machine.




Runners Up

2nd place: Ellie Mortimer, year 9 student at Scalby School, Scarborough (teacher Lisa Biggs)

Ellie’s entry was a fold up travel game of tic tac toe which included a small drawstring bag to store all of the star and planet shaped counters in. The game uses a variety of different fabrics and includes hand and machine embroidery, quilting, machine appliqué techniques The attention to detail is excellent as is the quality of the product. Ellie’s application form included a detailed description of the user of the product along with how her design would meet the user’s needs. She also talked about her inspiration coming from Sir Tim Peake’s travel to space which inspired the rocket theme with the planet and star counters. 


3rd place: Francesca Reynolds, year 8 student at Newlands Girls School, Maidenhead (teacher Wendy Bennett)

Francesca’s entry was an educational game called Pairs of Pears which came complete with instructions and a fabulous tiny clay trophy for the winner of the game. The aim of the game is to help children to learn the names of different fruits, to develop counting skills, and to help children become familiar with the idea of healthy food. 

Each piece of fruit is made out of felt and uses embroidery stitches and beads (the instructions also have sequin decoration on the back which can’t be seen in the pictures). The attention to detail on the fruit pieces is excellent and each piece literally looks good enough to eat! Francesca has also managed to get each piece to be virtually identical. There are some clever touches too such as the use of Velcro on the bananas so they can be peeled. What can’t be properly appreciated in the photos is how small each piece of fruit is; the strawberry is just 3cm square and the kiwi is just 4.5cm in diameter with all the rest of the fruit being of similar dimensions. This makes the level of accuracy and detail Francesca has achieved even more challenging. Francesca’s application form was also detailed explaining in detail about the user of the product and how it meets their needs. Special congratulations goes to Francesca as she also came second in last year’s competition and it was a real pleasure to see something very different to work last year. See her entry from last year. 


Highly Commended (listed in no particular order)

It is always such a pleasure to see all the competition entries each year and a genuine privilege that students and teachers have worked so hard to share their work with me. Choosing a winner and runners up is always extremely hard but this year was particularly difficult as there were at least 12 entries that stood out from the rest all for different reasons. Unfortuntely there couldn’t be 12 winners but the following 9 entries were awarded ‘Highly Commended’ and will also receive a small prize as each one only just missed out on being in the top three. 


Handy Hood, a fold up short hooded cape designed to carry around in your bag

Sarah Seager, year 9, Cornwallis Academy, Maidstone (teacher Mrs Rawlins)



Dinner in a Bag shopping bag with 5 recipes linked to QR codes to enable you to shop easily

Daisy Goodall, year 10, Flexion Girls School, Manchester (teacher Tracey Heaton)



Felted dolls house

Leonie-Mai Johnson, year 9, Hinchingbrooke School, Huntingdon (teacher Mrs Evans)




Sock teddy toy

Matthew Scott, year 7, Chipping Camden School, Gloucestershire (teacher Miss Streeter)



Travel car playmat

Ummhaani Mulla-Bulla, year 7, Clapton Girls Academy, London (teacher Hayley Morton)


Travelling pencil case

Isaac Hodgson, year 9, The Lakes School, Windermere (teacher Ms Anderson)




Owl light

Heather Edwards, year 8, Ashfield School, Kirby in Ashfield (teacher Helen Lloyd)



Child’s Dungarees

Lucy Turnbull, year 9, Weyvalley School, Weymouth (teacher E.Glass)





Toy to teach the days of the week & weather 

Elena Rossetti, year 9, St Clement Danes School, Chorleywood (teacher Mrs Firth)



Merit prizes (listed in no particular order)

The following entries were awarded a merit certificate. Although they weren’t quite good enough to be a potential prize winner each one had a little something extra that deserved recognition. 

Rose brooch by Ria Shoesmith, year 11, Prince William School, Peterborough (teacher J Richardson)

Survival kit for budding explorers (includes e-textiles emergency light) by Rebecca Gaskell & Morgan O’Hara, year 7, Madly High School, Crewe (teacher Olivia Hinton)

Roll up pencil case by Louisa Grieco, year 9, St Clement Danes School, Chorleywood (teacher Mrs Firth)

Pop up pin cushion (this is made perfectly to size so it pops up like a jack in a box when the box is opened) by Katie Woodbridge, year 7, Chipping Camden School, Gloucestershire (teacher Miss Streeter)

Paperweight and pin cushion by Eve Mayer, year 9, Wilmslow High School, Cheshire (teacher Miss Speed)

Dog lead holder with e-textiles torch by Sophie Hitchen, year 8, Prince Henrys School, Otley (teacher Gina Williams)

Cutlery roll (made of knitted plastic bags) by Amy Smith, year 9, Hinchingbrooke School, Huntingdon (teacher Mrs Evans)

Fold up dolls house with finger puppets by Rebecca Abbey, year 9, Scalby School, Scarborough (teacher Mrs Biggs)

Finger puppets by Georgia Bayliss, year 10, Cornwallis Academy, Maidstone (teacher Mrs Rawlins) 

Planet inspired stress relievers by Phoebe Aldrich (special congratulations to Phoebe as she was also the winner of the 2015 competition), Cornwallis Academy, Maidstone (teacher Mrs Rawlins)

Children’s activity pot with a toy rabbit, pencils & paper attached to the lid by Megan Shearn, year 7, Chipping Camden, Gloucestershire (teacher Miss Streeter)


Outstanding School Award

This award (and a small prize) goes to Denise Firth at St Clement Danes School in Chorleywood. This was awarded to the school as they submitted 11 entries which were all of a consistently good standard (including a 'Highly Commended’ and a ‘Merit’ award). All of the products were very different from each other and many were unusual and challenging. Students also completed the ‘user’ and ‘function’ sections of the application form in some detail. This prize aims to acknowledge the hard work of teachers who use the competition as a whole class project.



Other entries

Here’s a selection of other competition entries that impressed the judges. Can you see yours?

Many thanks to everyone who entered the competition. It has been a real pleasure to see the work of so many students and teachers. I know many schools also ran the competition as an internal school competition with only the best entries being sent to me so thanks also to those students who took part in the competition at their school. The standard of the work this year has been particularly impressive with a wide range of different ideas and high quality products. 


What will happen to the entries?

Unfortunately entries can’t be returned but they will be displayed at various events I am running across the country over the next year for teachers. 


Aims of My Competitions

  • To raise the profile of textiles and to get people talking about it
  • To motivate young people to think about textiles and to have a go
  • To provide prizes that provide schools with resources and equipment that helps them develop their curriculum
  • To provide teachers with project ideas, homework and activities that support curriculum development
  • To develop design skills, including: working to a design brief, interpreting a design theme, using inspiration, avoiding stereotyped and literal interpretations
  • To develop making skills, including: manipulating and handling materials, use of equipment, producing quality outcomes


Click here to see all previous competitions as well as the current one


Return to the main Designer Maker blog page

See blogs from previous years

Look in the side bar to view other blogs I write on textiles, D&T, education & coaching 

Contact:     Tel 01159 607061   Mob 07972 749240  Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk


A day full of designing & making

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During the school holidays my niece regularly comes over for the day and this summer holiday has been no exception. Like us, Millie enjoys anything to do with designing and making so after an early breakfast treat from a local cafe we made our way to the ‘Made in Sheffield’ exhibition in Sheffield Museum. Although quite small it was packed full of lots of products designed and made in the local area from hats, to carbon fibre world record breaking sledges to aircraft engines. 

made in sheffield
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After the exhibition we had a walk around Sheffield city centre, looking in lots of the arts and crafts shops, as well as visiting a large branch of Paperchase. I’m a big fan of any stationary shop so Paperchase is a regular haunt for me, but it turns out Millie has never been in one before. She loved it although I think she was overwhelmed by all the goodies on show, eventually deciding on a notebook to buy herself, but not before having a play with the novelty sunglasses!

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On the way home we visited Sherwood Forest Arts and Crafts Centre and all of this looking at designers and makers in action must have inspired her, as when we got home she still had lots of energy left to play around and experiment with some unusual materials on the sewing machine, including plastics, paper, thin metals and woods as well as more traditional textiles materials. We ended the day by baking a cake which is always one of her favourite activities and a great way to end another Millie designing and making adventure!

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See more of Millie’s design and make adventures!


Return to the main Designer Maker blog page

See blogs from previous years

Look in the side bar to view other blogs I write on textiles, D&T, education & coaching Tel 01159 607061   Mob 07972 749240  Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk

The Knitted Garden

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At the beginning of July I went to The Stitching, Sewing and Hobbycraft Show at the NEC as a birthday treat. This is a new show and to get people interested anyone who had been to an NEC show before got two free tickets. Not bad as a birthday treat as the cost of entry was £8 per person! The show was a lot smaller than many of the shows that take place at the NEC. It filled just one hall, whereas many of the other shows fill two or three. As my tickets were free I wasn’t complaining, although given the size of the show, I’m not sure I would have thought the cost was value for money if I had had to pay for the tickets. 

There was the usual mix of stalls, workshops, and demonstrations as well as some showcasing of the work of different textiles artists and groups. 

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I always like looking at the work of the textiles artists and groups and my favourite work on display was a knitted garden which was a large space set up as a garden where everything had either been knitted or covered with knitting. This was a fabulous fun display, with so much attention to detail, and some really clever touches. What a great community project. 

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knitted food
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Return to the main Designer Maker blog page

See blogs from previous years

Look in the side bar to view other blogs I write on textiles, D&T, education & coaching Tel 01159 607061   Mob 07972 749240  Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk


Mixing textiles with other materials to create innovative chair designs

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I came across these chairs as part of the work I do as an education consultant. The textiles curriculum in schools is changing from 2017 with textiles being seen as part of a broader spectrum of materials rather than just being a separate classification of techniques and fabrics. Students will be able to continue to design and make traditional textiles products but if they want to think differently, and in particular if they want to mix textiles with other materials the new qualifications will allow them to get credit for this in the mark scheme.  These chairs by students at the Rhode Island School for Design illustrate this mixing of materials and the creation of innovative products perfectly. 


Wall-To-Wall : Emre Bagdatoglu (materials/technique: polyester carpet rolls tided together with nylon rope). Using inexpensive off-the-shelf materials, and the concept of holding fabrics under compression to create a solid object, this chair is made of folded carpet strips held together by a network of utility rope. 

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Caterpillar Lounge  : Griffin Boswell & Ruth Henry (materials/technique: woven cotton/synthetic fabric, memory foam, elastic paracord on steel frame). The chair is made of woven fabric with integrated memory foam and elastic cord, which are added through the weaving process. The fabric is stretched over a steel frame held in place by a paracord lacing system that uses triangulation to create strength and flexibility.


Sinuous Chair: Noelle Antignano (materials/technique: upholstered foam woven through steel frame). The steel frame of the chair acts as the warp for the upholstered tubes that are woven throughout it. The chair has links to biomimicry as it is inspired by the controlled chaos found in nature.

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Million Loops: Maria Camarena Bernard & Aakanksha Sirothia (materials/technique: crocheted acrylic yarn, cotton muslin/batting, horsehair stuffing). This chair chair is made without any framework beyond that created by the hand-crocheted textiles making it structural and fluid at the same time.


Stretch Lounge: Michelle Dunbar & Mayela Mujica (materials/technique: industrially knitted wool/cotton/spandex fabric on stainless steel). The appearance of the chair transforms through use. When occupied, each section of the lounge stretches to reveal vibrant colors hidden in the folds of the knitted textile, which reverts back to its original form when not in use. The twist of the fabric means two people sit in opposite directions.

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Looped Pile Seat: Ana Mosseri & Elaina Runge (materials/technique: cotton upholstered foam strip and vinyl sheet on wooden frame, steel base). This chair is inspired by the way plush carpets are made. It has a continuous strip of upholstered foam pulled through a vinyl sheet base. Yarn has been pulled through a structural base fabric to form a surface of loops creating a sensual sitting experience.


The Big Empty: Reid Hoyt (materials/technique: polyester nylon mesh sleeve stretched over a steel frame). The chair is assembled by pulling a transparent mesh sleeve over a steel frame and zipping it shut thereby holding the fabric under tension. This construction method results in a comfortable, semi-rigid seating surface and makes use of a minimal number of parts to create a form.

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Paper Crochet Chair: Andrew Bannar & Noelle Webster (materials/technique: crocheted paper yarn on stainless steel frame). Constructed from paper yarn, this chair is tailored to fits onto its minimalistic stainless steel frame. The seat is suspended from the frame and the arms and backrest are self-reinforcing. This construction principle provides a self-supporting seating shell that is malleable but supportive    


For more information on the chairs & their designers visit The Narrative of Making 

Visit RISD Furniture Design & Textiles for more information on courses 


Return to the main Designer Maker blog page

See blogs from previous years

Look in the side bar to view other blogs I write on textiles, D&T, education & coaching Tel 01159 607061   Mob 07972 749240  Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk



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